Falcon 9 launch and landing

For Full Story: Florida Today

Article By: Emre Kelly

 

Falcon 9 launch and landing
Falcon 9 launch and landing

SpaceX’s quest to drive down launch costs and increase access to space will continue in the early morning darkness of Sunday when an upgraded Falcon 9 rocket vaults a commercial communications satellite from Cape Canaveral, then flips around to perform an automated return landing on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

If schedules hold, the California company’s newest version of the nine-engine Falcon 9, known as Block 5, will take flight on its second-ever mission from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 40 sometime during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. and closes at 5:50 a.m.

On board: Telstar 19 VANTAGE, a communications spacecraft operated by Canada-based Telesat and built in California that will focus on the Americas with high-speed broadband and other services. Falcon 9 will launch the 15,600-pound satellite into a geostationary transfer orbit, meaning the spacecraft will use its own propulsion to reach its final, fixed position thousands of miles above the equator.